Moe’s expands showroom for October High Point Market

Full line wholesaler and retailer Moe’s Home Collection will be in a new showroom for October’s High Point Market.

This move comes on the heels of the opening of its American flagship location in Seattle, ongoing success with its Digital Market webinars and virtual showroom, and the launching of its new, fully transactional B2B website.

“Being a lifestyle brand & product-focused company, we are always excited to bring hundreds of new products & our collections to High Point,” said Moe Samieian Jr., president of wholesale. “Now, we are even more excited with our move into a larger showroom that allows even more opportunity to stage the products.”

Around 50% larger than its previous showroom with more than 15,000 square feet, Moe’s new space is situated right by the escalators at IHFC C302. Fall’s High Point Market will be the company’s third home furnishings show in 2020, having also attended Las Vegas in January and August.

“Not only are we excited that the growth of our company required us to get a bigger space to showcase our products properly, but this new, larger showroom hosts a premium location for us to display to a wider audience,” said Seth King, vice president

How to Store Fresh Herbs

Fresh herbs add depth to recipes when added in the beginning and brightness at the end. They add color to otherwise drab-looking pasta, and can be used as a sauce for everything from grains to meat and veggies – pesto or chimichurri, anyone? As beautiful as herbs are, they don’t last long, but here’s how you can store them and use every last leaf.

What’s the difference between tender and hardy herbs?

  • Tender herbs include leafy varieties with soft stems, like basil, parsley, cilantro, and dill. (Mint can be classified as a tender herb, too, but we’ve found that it can be stored well like a hardy herb, too!).
  • Hardy herbs include types with woodier stems, like rosemary, thyme, and oregano. They’re also the ones that require less water to grow. Think: Rosemary growing in the clay-like soil of the Mediterranean and oregano growing on the sandy mountains of Greece.

    Where should you store herbs — on the counter or in the fridge?

    • Tender herbs benefit from being treated like live flowers and stored in water at room temperature – the fridge’s temperature and air can bruise bare, delicate leaves (two exceptions: Parsley and cilantro can stand